Posts Tagged ‘Mountain of God’


Numbers 10:1-2,8-10,33-36 Now the Lord said to Moses, “Make two trumpets of hammered silver for calling the community to assemble and for signaling the breaking of camp… Only the priests, Aaron’s descendants, are allowed to blow the trumpets. This is a permanent law for you, to be observed from generation to generation. “When you arrive in your own land and go to war against your enemies who attack you, sound the alarm with the trumpets. Then the Lord your God will remember you and rescue you from your enemies. Blow the trumpets in times of gladness, too, sounding them at your annual festivals and at the beginning of each month. And blow the trumpets over your burnt offerings and peace offerings. The trumpets will remind the Lord your God of his covenant with you. I am the Lord your God”… They marched for three days after leaving the mountain of the Lord, with the Ark of the Lord’s Covenant moving ahead of them to show them where to stop and rest. As they moved on each day, the cloud of the Lord hovered over them. And whenever the Ark set out, Moses would shout, “Arise, O Lord, and let your enemies be scattered! Let them flee before you!” And when the Ark was set down, he would say, “Return, O Lord, to the countless thousands of Israel!”

Today’s chapter marks the beginning of the Exodus journey it seems as God leads them through the desert in an orderly fashion but in a long-winded route.

In all my years of attending churches in different part of the world, I have never heard a trumpet being used and so what is the context of this in our day and time? (more…)


Exodus 18:5,9,12,17-23 Jethro, Moses’ father-in-law, together with Moses’ sons and wife, came to him in the desert, where he was camped near the mountain of God… Jethro was delighted to hear about all the good things the LORD had done for Israel in rescuing them from the hand of the Egyptians… Then Jethro, Moses’ father-in-law, brought a burnt offering and other sacrifices to God, and Aaron came with all the elders of Israel to eat bread with Moses’ father-in-law in the presence of God… Moses’ father-in-law replied, “What you are doing is not good. You and these people who come to you will only wear yourselves out. The work is too heavy for you; you cannot handle it alone. Listen now to me and I will give you some advice, and may God be with you. You must be the people’s representative before God and bring their disputes to him. Teach them the decrees and laws, and show them the way to live and the duties they are to perform. But select capable men from all the people—men who fear God, trustworthy men who hate dishonest gain—and appoint them as officials over thousands, hundreds, fifties and tens. Have them serve as judges for the people at all times, but have them bring every difficult case to you; the simple cases they can decide themselves. That will make your load lighter, because they will share it with you. If you do this and God so commands, you will be able to stand the strain, and all these people will go home satisfied.”

Well meaning visitors are often a great blessing as was Jethro whose visit brought Moses and the Israelites much comfort both then and even today. Jethro’s visit was not only a formality but because God led him to.

We know that God chose Moses to lead the Israelites out of bondage in Egypt and take them to a land of their own but how then could Moses pass on the mantle of leadership to others? (more…)


Exodus 3:1-2,18-22 Now Moses was keeping the flock of his father-in-law, Jethro, the priest of Midian, and he led his flock to the west side of the wilderness and came to Horeb, the mountain of God. And the angel of the LORD appeared to him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush. He looked, and behold, the bush was burning, yet it was not consumed… And they will listen to your voice, and you and the elders of Israel shall go to the king of Egypt and say to him, ‘The LORD, the God of the Hebrews, has met with us; and now, please let us go a three days’ journey into the wilderness, that we may sacrifice to the LORD our God.’ But I know that the king of Egypt will not let you go unless compelled by a mighty hand. So I will stretch out my hand and strike Egypt with all the wonders that I will do in it; after that he will let you go. And I will give this people favor in the sight of the Egyptians; and when you go, you shall not go empty, but each woman shall ask of her neighbor, and any woman who lives in her house, for silver and gold jewelry, and for clothing. You shall put them on your sons and on your daughters. So you shall plunder the Egyptians.”

We come to the point in Moses’ life where he is being called into God’s service, and like I was once reminded, this was the third third of his life. The first forty years were spent as royalty in Egypt, the next forty as a shepherd in the land of Midian and the last forty as leader of a nation as he led the captive Israelites away from Egyptian bondage.

We note God’s amazing way of getting a shepherd’s attention, the forward covenant God makes with Moses to show He will see him through, the great promise of delivery, the leadership role Moses would be given, the acceptance of the elders of Israel, the hardness of Pharaoh’s heart and finally the plunder of the Egyptians after their women give their riches.

God heard the mourning of the Israelites who had to toil day and night for the oppressive Egyptians. This was foretold to Abraham, came to pass and now we wonder why God would permit such suffering.

Four hundred and thirty years of oppression is what the Israelites had to undergo before they were led out of Egypt and does that not seem a bit much of suffering? (more…)